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FORT MCMURRAY EMERGENCY
RARE-BREEDS OWNERS IN THE DISASTER AREA
CAN CONTACT THE RBC OFFICE FOR HELP WITH TEMPORARY
RE-LOCATION FROM RBC MEMBERS

 
RBC Office:
RR 1. NESBITT. MB. R0K 1P0.
Now accepting E-Transfers for Membership payments.
Call: 204 573-8204
or Email:
rbc@rarebreedscanada.org



NAME THE CALVES COMPETITION FOR HEIFERS AND BULLS

We need your help in naming these beautiful calves.
Please go to the heading in the banner to see photographs of these calves

 
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'RARE BREEDS RENAISSANCE'


FORTHCOMING EVENT

'RARE BREEDS RENAISSANCE'
GROWING OUR FUTURE FROM OUR PAST

http://flextimeinc7.wix.com/rbrenaissance


https://www.facebook.com/events/427439084126288

JUNE 10-12th. 2016
AGM, BANQUET, PRESENTATIONS, FARM & MUSEUM TOUR
ROSS CREEK CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
CANNING, NOVA SCOTIA.

WWW.ARTSCENTRE.CA

FOR MORE DETAILS CONTACT RBC DIRECTOR STACY CORKUM
stacycory@hotmail.com TEL: 902 698 2507

Register on-line NOW!

http://www.artscentre.ca/rare-breeds-canada-at-ross-creek/



Click here to download and print a proxy form.





SHARE THE RIDE AND CARPOOL TO AGM
LOOKING FOR A RIDE TO AGM?
OR
DO YOU HAVE SPACE IN YOUR CAR TO SHARE THE DRIVE TO AGM?
IF SO PLEASE GO TO THE LINK BELOW


https://www.sharetheride.com/public/Home.aspx


 

INTERNATIONAL & NATIONAL SPEAKERS:
LAWRENCE ALDERSON CBE, ELAINE SHIRLEY
JEANNETTE BERANGER, SKYLAR ANDERSON
TOM HUTCHINSON PH.D, MERLIN FORD




 
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Louise, day old Cotswold ewe lamb born at Hidden Meadow Farm, NS

Suffolk5

OLD PHOTOGRAPH CONTEST

People's Choice Award

We need your top three votes for your favourite photographs. Please email Rare Breeds Canada's office with your top three choices - rbc@rarebreedscanada.org

Include your name, address and the corresponding letters of your first three choices. Thank you
A

A

Lisa Clouston's Grandma feeding lambs, MB.

Doug Law's Great-Grandfather with horse.

D

D

1934 – Okla, Saskatchewan - George with yoke of oxen – Sam on right weighed 2000 lbs and Her shire cross on left weighed 1600 lbs, was driven with a mare as well. Sam pulled the tumbling rake for George in 1931 when George was 13 years old. George quoted, “one kid drove the ox and the other handled the rake”. Submitted by Muriel Mitchell Saskatchewan

G

G

G5 George Johnson 1942 – Spring – hauling firewood for sale – George got $3-4 a cord.

J

J

I have lived on our farm/ranch near the beautiful hamlet of Indus, Alberta for thirty-seven years. Prior to this I was raised in south western Alberta and eastern British Columbia. My early childhood was on a guest ranch near Pincher Creek. I have two black and white photographs from the Buckhorn Ranch, one showing me as a four year old holding a team for my Dad and on another occasion I was driving a pony on a cart! Horses have been a part of my life for all but maybe ten years when I lived in the city. Horses are a passion for me. I retired eighteen years ago and I have been playing wheelwright, wagon builder, training, and driving horses ever since. Verne Kemble Indus, Alberta

B

B

1944, my grandfather, William John Allison (1878-1948) watching over me.

The farm was in Nassagaweya Township of Halton County.

The family had come from Yorkshire England in the 1830’s.

Today my wife and I live on a farm in Flamborough Township of Wentworth Country where we raise Clydesdale horses, chickens and bees. I still often think back to my happy early days on my grandparents farm. Dr. J. David Richardson Christieview Farm 330 Hwy 8, RR 1 Dundas ON “Home of Gentle Giants and busy bees”

E

E

John and Mary Mitchell embodied the true spirit of the pioneers of Saskatchewan through their hard work, perseverance, and determination. John Walter Mitchell was born May 21, 1911 in Preeceville, Saskatchewan, John and his wife, Gladys Mary Norman, devoted their lives to this farm. The homestead remained in the Mitchell family for 100 years. Gladys Mary Mitchell (nee Norman) was born December 6, 1915 in Stranraer, Sask. Mary was very experienced working with 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8 horse hooks doing fieldwork, seeding, and haying. Mary’s move to Preeceville from Stranraer, Saskatchewan was another historical and memorable event for the area. Mary loaded her new tractor and her favorite team of Clydesdale cross mares in one CN boxcar and a very select, high quality herd of twelve Shorthorn cattle in another. They arrived at Buchanan, Saskatchewan and she drove her tractor and led her team the 22 miles from Buchanan to the Mitchell farm south of Preeceville. The cattle were transported by truck.

H

H

The Mule and the Bull Here is a photograph of an old neighbour, Ross Falener from Concord Glengarry years ago with a mule and a bull. He had to be quite a teamster, don’t you think and also good at hooking the team up. Dennis Cook, Pictou Co. Nova Scotia

K

K

The picture of a man and horse, we think, is a brother of the man who taught my great grandfather( Ward Roelofson) blacksmithing. Photo submitted by Doug Law

C

C

John and Mary Mitchell embodied the true spirit of the pioneers of Saskatchewan through their hard work, perseverance, and determination. John Walter Mitchell was born May 21, 1911 in Preeceville, Saskatchewan, John and his wife, Gladys Mary Norman, devoted their lives to this farm. The homestead remained in the Mitchell family for 100 years. Gladys Mary Mitchell (nee Norman) was born December 6, 1915 in Stranraer, Sask. Mary was very experienced working with 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8 horse hooks doing fieldwork, seeding, and haying. Mary’s move to Preeceville from Stranraer, Saskatchewan was another historical and memorable event for the area. Mary loaded her new tractor and her favorite team of Clydesdale cross mares in one CN boxcar and a very select, high quality herd of twelve Shorthorn cattle in another. They arrived at Buchanan, Saskatchewan and she drove her tractor and led her team the 22 miles from Buchanan to the Mitchell farm south of Preeceville. The cattle were transported by truck.

Muriel and Bonnie, Bonnie was one of the mares that Mom brought with her on the train when she married Dad. Muriel Mitchell Saskatchewan

F

F

1940’s my grandfather with the horses and the binder.

The farm was in Nassagaweya Township of Halton County.

The family had come from Yorkshire England in the 1830’s.

Today my wife and I live on a farm in Flamborough Township of Wentworth Country where we raise Clydesdale horses, chickens and bees. I still often think back to my happy early days on my grandparents farm. Dr. J. David Richardson Christieview Farm 330 Hwy 8, RR 1 Dundas ON “Home of Gentle Giants and busy bees”

I

I

I have lived on our farm/ranch near the beautiful hamlet of Indus, Alberta for thirty-seven years. Prior to this I was raised in south western Alberta and eastern British Columbia. My early childhood was on a guest ranch near Pincher Creek. I have two black and white photographs from the Buckhorn Ranch, one showing me as a four year old holding a team for my Dad and on another occasion I was driving a pony on a cart! Horses have been a part of my life for all but maybe ten years when I lived in the city. Horses are a passion for me. I retired eighteen years ago and I have been playing wheelwright, wagon builder, training, and driving horses ever since. Verne Kemble Indus, Alberta

L

L

Thomas Henry Sadler My Grandfather was Thomas Henry who came to Canada from Ireland with his father, Thomas and his mother, Jane Lockhead when he was 12 years old. While they walked from Perth to the farm in Pakenham, his mother took sick and died. She is buried somewhere on the Old Perth Road. He and his Dad settled in Pakenham Township on a farm. They were successful farmers because of their background in market gardening in Ireland. They made maple syrup, milked Holstein cows as well. My Grandfather’s favourite team was Bob and Charlie. In this photograph is my grandfather with this team in about 1913. Unfortunately this team came to an untimely end due to certain circumstances. Thomas Henry’s brother, George was a doctor in Combermere, Ontario. George came to visit his brother by train. During his stay he received a telegram informing him of an outbreak of a contagious disease, which required his immediate attention. The train wasn’t going back until late the next day. So George took this team to drive to Combermere, which is about 100 miles. As a result of this emergency drive one of the horses had to be destroyed shortly after reaching Combermere and the second horse had to be destroyed a week later. Thomas Henry never again owned such an exceptional team in his lifetime. as doing mixed farming. I was the first grandchild and I was 12 years old when he died. My father and mother lived across the road from my grandfather. So I spent a great deal of time with him. Earl Sadler, Pakenham, Ontario


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Come Look at Our New Blog

Rare Breeds Canada is a federally registered charitable organization formed in 1987. We are working to conserve, monitor and promote heritage and rare breeds of Canadian farm animals.
 

Conservation takes many forms: we work to increase populations, encourage registration of pure stock, assist farmers to find breeding stock, educate the public, maintain a bank of rare semen and create networks so farmers can find and exchange stock and find markets for their produce.
 

Markets are developing for heritage meats–in many cases demand outstrips supply. Thanks to years of dedicated work by Livestock Conservation organization around the world, there is a glimmer of hope for heritage breeds. As long as we will eat them, farmers will keep them.
 

Many breeds that played a vital part in feeding Canadians in the past are still in danger of extinction. Our annual Conservation List takes the pulse of these fragile populations. Rare Breeds Canada also collects data in targeted census counts to understand population distribution.
 

Food security is an important issue in our conservation effort. The genetics of the older rustic breeds have qualities that are in demand now and may be invaluable in the future. Today’s industrial farming methods of intensification and specialization 

have put our food supply at risk by creating a dangerous dependency on a narrow genetic base and highly mechanized management.
 

Heritage breeds are thrifty, easy keepers– are disease resistant, birth easily, and have superior mothering abilities. Chefs and cheese 

makers all over the world are excited about the superior taste of heritage meat & dairy products.

Heritage breeds are ideally suited to organic and sustainable agriculture systems such as rotational grazing and natural, outdoor livestock housing. They complement smallholdings and can be equally successful commercially in the developing niche markets for conscientious consumers.

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